Anna Maria Buhler

F, b. circa 1752
     Anna Maria Buhler was born circa 1752. She married Peter Spyker, son of Johannes Peter Spyker and Regina (?), on 28 April 1772 at Lebanon, Pennsylvania.
      As of 28 April 1772,her married name was Spyker.
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Children of Anna Maria Buhler and Peter Spyker

Johannes Spyker

F, b. 1775
     Johannes Spyker was born in 1775. She was the daughter of Peter Spyker and Anna Maria Buhler.
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Johan Jacob Spyker

M, b. 1780
     Johan Jacob Spyker was born in 1780. He was the son of Peter Spyker and Anna Maria Buhler.
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Johanna Regina Spyker

F, b. 1782
     Johanna Regina Spyker was born in 1782. She was the daughter of Peter Spyker and Anna Maria Buhler.
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John Conrad Weiser

M, b. 29 September 1725, d. September 1775
     John Conrad Weiser was born on 29 September 1725 at Berks, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Christopher Frederick Weiser and Catherine Elizabeth Roeder. John Conrad Weiser married Maria Margaret Batdorf, daughter of Johannes Martin Batdorf and Margaretha Elisabetha Walborn, on 29 January 1749 at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. John Conrad Weiser married Elizabeth Preiss on 3 February 1774. John Conrad Weiser died in September 1775.
      Known as Johannes Weiser, perhaps to distinguish him from his uncle, John Conrad, the Indian diplomat. John Conrad Weiser was also known as Johannes Conrad.
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Children of John Conrad Weiser and Maria Margaret Batdorf

Christopher Frederick Weiser

M, b. 24 February 1699, d. 6 June 1768
     Christopher Frederick Weiser was born on 24 February 1699 at Gross Aspach, Wurttemberg, Germany. He was the son of John Conrad Weiser and Anna Magdalena Uebele. Christopher Frederick Weiser married Catherine Elizabeth Roeder in 1721. Christopher Frederick Weiser died on 6 June 1768 at Emmaus, Pennsylvania, at age 69.
      On 17 June 1710 John Conrad Weiser; The Spykers, Crists, Kadermans, &c., came over with Conrad Weiser to New York, in 1710, from a place called Herrenburg, in Wurtemberg, Germany. In 1729, they all removed together to Tulpehocken, Berks County, Pennsylvania.
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Children of Christopher Frederick Weiser and Catherine Elizabeth Roeder

John Conrad Weiser

M, b. circa 1662, d. 13 July 1746
     John Conrad Weiser was born circa 1662 at Grossapach, Germany. He was the son of Jacob II Weiser and Anna Tretz. John Conrad Weiser married Anna Magdalena Uebele, daughter of Hanna Johannas Uebele and Anna Catherine (?), circa 1686 at Germany. John Conrad Weiser married Anna Margaret Miller in 1711. John Conrad Weiser died on 13 July 1746 at Womelsdorf, Berks, Pennsylvania.
      John Conrad Weiser was also known as Conrad. They had sixteen children. After his wife, Anna's, death, he came to America with eight children, arriving in New York on 13 June 1710. In the Spring of 1711, he had married Anna Margaret Miller, and with her he had three children. However, nothing is known of their life together. They came from the Palatinate to East Camp, Dutchess County. It is generally believed that Johann Conrad Weiser was buried at Zion or Reed's Churchyard in Stouchburg, Pennsylvania; however there are some grounds for assuming he found his last resting place at the Weiser farm, now Weiser Park, in Womeldorf. Weiser Family, Phalzische Familien und Wappenkunde Vol. Five No. 10 (1966). Translated January 1973; JDBaldwin): Among the leaders of the German colonists who settled in America in 1710 (the majority came from the Pfalz so they were generally called Pfalzer, or Palatines) were two Schwabians, Johann Conrad Weiser Sr. born about 1662 in Grossaspaach, Wuerttember, died 1746 in Tulpehocken, Berks Co, Penna., and his son Johann Conrad Weiser Jr. born in Kueppingen bei Affstaett, Wuerttemberg, Nov 2, 1696, died in Tulpehocken July 13, 1760. Johann Conrad Sr. first entered into marriage with Anna Magdalena Ubelen (?-Ubele), daughter of Hans Ubelen. The couple had fifteen children, the names of thirteen of which are known. Johann Conrad was corporal the Wuerttemberg "Blue Dragoons" as he wrote down in his family record. He must have concluded his service in the troop about 1700, for at that time he first appears in the records as a baker, an occupation which he pursued up to his emigration for America in 1709. During fifteenth confinement, Anna Maria died suddenly on May 1, 1709, following convulsions. Johann Conrad left Grossaspach (probably from dissatisfaction with living conditions there) on June 24, 1709. His oldest daughter, already married, bought his property, and he took his eight remaining living children with him. They went to London, from where they sailed for America a month later. Their ship "The Lyon" landed in New York June 13, 1710. Then began an unaccustomed career for the German emigrant who up to this time had led a harsh life in Wuerttemberg. As soon as Johann Conrad came into association with the other German immigrants, he became more and more their leader. In New York, Palatine immigrants were undertaking production of tar from the rosin of the sprucewood. They lived in an encampment in the vicinity of Hudson, about 100 miles north of New York City. Next, the colonists were divided among five villages. Johann Conrad was the administrator of one of these villages. In this position he represented the interests of the settlers before Governor Robert Hunter in facing the most impossible problems. No more tar could be produced from the trees, the overseer of the Palatines, Robert Livingston, was a villain, and the Germans needed better living conditions, above all better nutrition and some land. During the military campaign of 1711, the difficulties reached their highpoint. Johann Conrad was one of the leaders of the Palatine troop contingents. As the soldiers returned from an unsuccessful battle in the north of New York and recognized that their families were on the edge of hunger, Weiser brought the grievances of the Palatines before the governor. This event ended with Hunter becoming enraged against the Palatines and ordered their disarmament. Nevertheless, the following year he guaranteed them complete freedom in the selection of their settlements. Johann Conrad was one of the men who were subsequently selected by the German immigrants to seek land at Schoharie, about fifty miles west of Albany. Soon after, a small village known as Weiserdorf was established there. This place is known as Middleburg today. The living conditions were wretched, however through hard work, they created a new home for themselves in this wilderness. He immigrated on 24 June 1709; left for America June 24, 1709; John Conrad sold his property to his already-married eldest daughter and took the surviving eight children to London, from which they embarked several months later. The ships floated around in various English harbors from December 1709 until April 1710, when 3 warships and Robert Hunter, NY governor, joined the group and began the crossing. Conditions were dreadful and many died. Their vessel, the Lyon, landed at New York on June 13, 1710, with nine other vessels full with 800 other families, who had fled down the Rhine valley to Rotterdam, and then across to London to escape the ravages and persecutions of Louis XIV, the Catholic, had let loose on Protestant Germany after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. The poor of London had come to resent them deeply, and that's why many of the immigrants were rushed off to New York to serve as a buffer against the French, a Protestant buffer, and as suppliers of naval stores.

There, about 2400 souls of the original 4000 who started the trip made it to quarantine on Governor's Island in Manhattan. About 250 more people died there, and were buried on Governor's Island. The English insisted that older children be indentured to settled residents, so John Conrad's two children George Frederick and Christopher Frederick were bound out by the governor to Long Island. The remaining Palatine immigrants were bound to produce tar from the pitch of pine trees at camps near the Hudson River, about 100 miles north of New York City. Eventually, there came to be the East Camps (really four small villages of Annesbury, Queensbury, Haysbury and Hunterstown, with a joint population of 1189), and the West Camps (614 people in 3 villages). It is doubtful if there are that many people there today, according to Elaine B Liepshutz, in The Palatine Camps of 1710! The settlers were divided into five villages at first, and John Conrad was the head of Queensbury. As such, he voiced the complaints of his fellowmen before Governor Robert Hunter, who was caught in an impossible situation: the trees could produce no tar, the overseer of the Palatines (Robert Livingston) was a scoundrel, and the Germans expected better conditions-- plenty of food (all provisions were issued from Manor warehouses) and land of their own. Even children walked the three miles to the pine forests to work, picking up fallen knots from trees. On 17 June 1710 The Spykers, Crists, Kadermans, &c., came over with Conrad Weiser to New York, in 1710, from a place called Herrenburg, in Wurtemberg, Germany. In 1729, they all removed together to Tulpehocken, Berks County, Pennsylvania.
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Children of John Conrad Weiser and Anna Magdalena Uebele

Child of John Conrad Weiser and Anna Margaret Miller

Anna Magdalena Uebele

F, b. 1668, d. 1 May 1709
     Anna Magdalena Uebele was born in 1668. She was the daughter of Hanna Johannas Uebele and Anna Catherine (?). Anna Magdalena Uebele married John Conrad Weiser, son of Jacob II Weiser and Anna Tretz, circa 1686 at Germany. Anna Magdalena Uebele died on 1 May 1709; Anna Magdalena, widow of Johann Conrad Weisser... was bur. 1 May 1709, aged 43 yrs - pregnant with her 15th child.
      Anna Magdalena Uebele was also known as Ubelen. Anna Magdalena Uebele was also known as Ubelin. As of circa 1686,her married name was Weiser.
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Children of Anna Magdalena Uebele and John Conrad Weiser

Colonel John Conrad Weiser

M, b. 2 November 1696, d. 13 July 1760
Conrad Weiser
Conrad Weiser
     Colonel John Conrad Weiser was born on 2 November 1696 at Germany. He was the son of John Conrad Weiser and Anna Magdalena Uebele. Colonel John Conrad Weiser married Anna Eva Feck on 22 November 1720 at New York. Colonel John Conrad Weiser died on 13 July 1760 at Womelsdorf, Pennsylvania, at age 63; Conrad died 7/13/1760 on his farm at Womelsdorf PA, where he is buried. A sandstone slab marks the spot of his final journey with the inscription "Dieses ist die Ruhe Staette des weyl Ehren geachten M Conradt Weiser. der Selbige gebohren 1696 d 2 November in Astaet im Amt Herrenberg im wittenberger Lande und gestorben 1760 d 13 Julius ist alt worden 64 Jahr 3M 3 wch" or "This is the resting place of the greatly honored respected M Conradt Weiser, the same born..."
      Biography of Conrad Weiser - Perhaps the most fitting accolade bestowed on Conrad Weiser was by an Iroquois, who, speaking to white men upon the death of Weiser in 1760, lamented, "We are at a great loss and sit in darkness...as since his death we cannot so well understand one another."

Who was this man who had such far-reaching influence on relations between Pennsylvania and the Iroquois Confederacy; who had access to provincial governors and sachems alike; who interpreted and negotiated treaties; who was commissioned an officer during the War for Empire; but who also sat as a country judge, served as lay minister, and prospered as a farmer, tanner, and storekeeper?

Conrad Weiser was born November 2, 1696, in the German principality of Wurttemberg. By 1709, his father, Johann Conrad Weiser, had decided to heed Queen Anne's invitation to inhabitants of the Rhine Valley to migrate to England and to the British colonies in America.

The Weiser family settled on the New York frontier and in the winter and spring of 1712-1713, young Conrad resided with neighboring Mohawks to learn the language of the Iroquois and serve as a go-between for the German community.

During his years in New York, Weiser acquired a keen knowledge of the language, customs and statesmanship of the Iroquois Confederacy (or Six Nations), consisting of the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, Senecas and Tuscaroras.

By 1723, Germans from the Mohawk Valley had begun the overland trek 400 miles, following the Susquehanna river to settle the Tulpehocken Valley in what is now Berks and Lebanon Counties, Pennsylvania. In 1729, Weiser brought his German-born wife, Anna Eve, and their children to the Tulpehocken region, settling on 200 acres near the present town of Womelsdorf.

Over the next 31 years Weiser became a major land-holder, farmer, tanner and businessman. He and Anna Eve raised 14 children (seven of whom lived to adulthood).

By the early 1730's, Weiser had become known in government circles in Philadelphia for his knowledge of the Iroquois. Provincial Secretary James Logan hired him to guide the new Pennsylvania Indian policy recognizing Iroquois dominance over the indigenous Lenni Lenape and guaranteeing a stable and safe frontier.

Over the next two decades Weiser was constantly directing and implementing this policy through treaty negotiations, land purchases, and journeys to the Iroquois homeland. He worked closely with Shikellamy, who had been appointed by the Confederacy to embody Iroquois authority over the Lenni Lenape.

It was through Weiser and Shikellamy that the Pennsylvania frontier remained stable and peaceful until mid-century.

By 1755, however, growing competition between Britain and France had ignited a full-blown "War for Empire." Diplomacy was put aside as the Six Nations divided over which side to join.

Meanwhile, the French established an alliance with the Lenni Lenape and other Native American peoples and launched raids against the eastern Pennsylvania settlements along the Blue Mountain line.

Pennsylvania responded by forming provincial militia and building a line of outposts. In 1756, Weiser received a commission of Lieutenant Colonel with command of the 1st Battalion, Pennsylvania Regimen responsible for manning the line between the Delaware and Susquehanna Rivers. He held this post until 1758. In that same year an expedition to western Pennsylvania by General John Forbes resulted in the eviction of the French and an end to the fighting in eastern Pennsylvania.

Throughout his life, Weiser was active in local affairs. He served as a magistrate for Lancaster County, helped found and lay out the town of Reading in 1748, helped to establish Berks County in 1752, and was its President Judge until his death.

Though a Lutheran, Weiser joined the monastic community of Ephrata Cloister between 1735 and 1741. He lived intermittently as a celibate brother, withdrawing from family and political life until becoming disenchanted with the Cloister's leader Conrad Beissel.

Weiser, returning to the Lutheran Church, in which he had served as a lay minister, became a founder of Trinity Church in Reading. His daughter Maria married Henry Melchoir Muhlenberg, "patriarch" of the Lutheran Church in Pennsylvania.

At this death on July 13, 1760, Weiser owned several thousand acres, in addition to his farm, tannery and the store in Reading.

Movements to honor Weiser's considerable accomplishments culminated in the establishment of the Conrad Weiser Memorial Park by the Conrad Weiser Memorial Park Association in 1928. The nationally known Olmsted Brothers landscape firm designed the park.

Owned now by the Commonwealth, the Conrad Weiser Homestead is administered by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, which preserves the restored Weiser structures, graveyard and landscaped park, in addition to interpreting Weiser's life. Conrad Weiser was the most prominent historical character in the county of Berks previous to his death in 1760. His great prominence arose from his intimate connection with the provencial government of Pennsylvania for thirty years. He was the principal judge of Berks County from 1752 to 1760. He was born November 2, 1696, at Afstaedt, a small village in the County of Herrenberg, in Wurtemberg, Germany, and there he acquired a general education, which included the principles of the Christian religion according to the catechism of Martin Luther. Whilst still in his fourteenth year he emigrated with his father and famiy (which included himself and seven other children) to New York, landing June 17, 1710. At that time several thousand Germans were sent to America by Queen Anne. Shortly after thier arrival they were removed to Livingston Manor by the Governor of New York, to burn tar and cultivate hemp to defray the expenses incurred by Queen Anne in conveying them from Holland to England and from England to America. They labored till 1713 in this employment under the direction of commissioners: then, finding that they were existing under a form of bondage, they protested against the treatment and this effected their release. About 150 families of them including the Weiser famiy, removed to Schoharie, forty miles west of Albany. Whilst spending the winter of 1713-1714 at Schenectady, the elder Weiser was frequently visited by an Indian chief of the Mohawk tribe, and during one of these proposed to Conrad to visit the Mohawk country and learn the language of that tribe. This proposition was agreed to. Conrad Weiser was in his eighteenth year when he went to live with the Indians. He was a strong young man, but all of his strength was necessary to endure the sufferings which he was compelled to undergo whilst living with them. He had scarely clothing sufficient to cover his body during the winter of that trying year. Besides much suffering, he was frequently threatened with death by the Indians during a state of intoxication. In July, 1714, he returned to his father's home at Schoharie. In Mohawk language, and while at home, he increased this knowledge by acting as interpreter between the German settlers of that vicinity and the Mohawk Indians. The settlers having been disturbed in their possessions, Conrad Weiser's father and a number of others migrated to Pennsylvania. They located in Tulpehocken in the spring on 1723, in the midst of the Indians: and there they also commenced the improvement of the land without permission from the land commissioners. The Indians complained but the settlers were not disturbed. Subsequently the Indians released their rights and about 1733 they moved beyond the Blue Moutains. Conrad Weiser was married to a young woman of Schoharie in 1720. He continued at that place till 1729,when with his wife and five children he removed to the Tulpehocken settlement, locating on a tract of land near the present borough of Womelsdorf. Shortly after his arrival, his ability and sucess as an Indian interpreter became known to the Provencial government, and the Governor employed him in negotiation with the Indians. His first services in this capacity were performed in 1731, and from that time for nearly thirty years he was almost constantly engaged in this important work. He assisted at numerous treaties, and in the published proceedings of these treaties his name appears prominently. His integrity was particularly recognized and publicly complimented. He was one of the most prominent men in the French and Indian War. His numerous letters indicate his zeal, courage and patriotism. He served in the war as a colonel, and his services were of great value to the government and to the people of Berks county. The first proceedings for the erection of Berks county were instituted in 1738. In this behalf, Mr. Weiser was very active, and he continued active till the county was established in 1752. The town of Reading was laid out by the Penns in 1748, and in the ale of the town lots Mr. Weiser acted as one of the commissioners. He was prominently identified with the first movements in building up the town, and in developing the business interests of the place. The Governor of the Province, in 1741, appointed him as a justice of the peace, and he filled this office for a number of years. When the county was erected
in 1752, he was appointed one of the first judges. He acted as president judge of the courts till his decease in 1760. He lived at Reading mostly during the latter part of his life. Conrad Weiser died on his Heidleberg farm July 13, 1760, and his remains were buried in a private burying ground on the place, where they have remained
since. He left a widow and seven children: five sons, Phillip, Frederick, Peter, Samuel and Benjamin; and two daughters, Maria (m. Rev. Henry Melchoir Muhlenberg) and Margaret (m. a Finker). He was possessed of a large estate, consisting of properties at Reading, and lands in Heidleberg township and in the region of country beyond the Blue Mountains. In heidleberg, he owned a
tract which included the privilege of a "Court-Baron", granted to him in 1743, the tract having originally contained 5,165 acres as granted to John Page in 1735, and having then been erected into a manor, called the "Manor of Plumton". At Reading one of his properties was business stand, and it has continued to be a prominent business location from that time till now, a period embracing over 150 years. Colonel Conrad Weiser, of Berks County, a lieutenant-colonel in the French and Indian War, and later head of the Indian Bureau of the Province of Pennsylvania. The eldest son of John Conrad and Anna Magdelena (Uebele) Weiser was given his father's names at his birth 2 November 1696. By his own statement, his birth took place at Affstaett about twenty miles southeast of Stuttgart, where it is assumed some of all of his father's military unit lay in winter quarters. One farm in the village, the "Powder Farm" is said to have been used for this purpose. Conrad may well have been born there. He became known generally as Conrad Weiser. Although Conrad's statement exists that he was baptized at Kuppingen, a village nearby, there is no entry in its records of this fact. Perhaps this was an oversight of the pastor, an explanation especially conceivable when it is realized that there are gaps in the parochial registers. Perhaps as a child of a member of the military not from the area, Conrad's baptism was not considered by the pastor appropriate to enter.

Conrad emigrated to America in 1710 with his father, a shortly thereafter was placed in the hands of the Mohawks. From them he acquired the knowledge of Indian words and ways which launched him on the career that has made his name known in the annals of Pennsylvania and national history of the colonial era... Conrad Weiser, Pennsylvania's Indian ambassador, was one of the world's great originals, a hotheaded, true-hearted, whimsical Jack-of-all-trades; a farmer and owner of a tannery, one of the founders of Reading, Pennsylvania, a colonel during the French and Indian War, the first President judge of Berks County, a monk at Ephrata Cloisters, a pillar of the Lutheran Church, a promoter of Moravian missions, a rebel in New York and prisoner in an Albany jail, a hymn-writer, traveler, statesman, linguist, diplomat, woodsman and most notably an Indian agent.

His career introduces us to the whole colonial scene from New York to the Carolinas, taking in the seacoast towns, the frontier settlements, the forests of the Alleghenies, and the long houses and cabins of the Indians on the Hudson, Mohawk, Delaware, Susquehanna, and Ohio Rivers. He bought books from Benjamin Franklin and taught him what he knew about the Iroquois. He corresponded with Thomas Lee, the "President of Virginia." He quarreled with Gov. Denny of Pennsylvania, and in the conduct of Indian affairs, he was the rival of George Washington and Sir William Johnson. He introduced Count Zinzindorf to the Shawnees and saved his life in the Wyoming valley. He was advisor to Thomas Penn, General Forbes, and countless other notables. In his day, everyone knew him. Governors, churchmen, and Indian chiefs all relied on his advise. The Iroquois named him Tarachiawagon, "He Who Holds The Heavens." He was at home on Society Hill in Philadelphia as well as at John Harris' Ferry on the western frontier. He knew the Shamokin Trail like a village street and visited all the distant Indian towns from Onandaga to Logstown. He went everywhere, saw everyone, did everything and recorded in his journals, the most important information of his day. There was never any man like him, and never will be. He was as vital to the Pennsylvania frontier as George Washington was to Valley Forge. Yet, through all the excitement of his public life, he remained a common man who, above all else, always longed for his wife, his children and the little Tulpehocken home to which he came back finally to die. Colonel John Conrad Weiser was also known as Conrad. Conrad Weiser was born in the German principality of Württemberg on November 2, 1696. But shortly after his birth, Conrad's father heeded Queen Anne of England's invitation to migrate to England and the British Colonies in America. Eventually, the Weiser family settled in New York. By the age of 15, young Weiser had developed a keen sense of language and a genuine interest in the local Iroquois Indian population. He applied his linguistic abilities to learn their language, with hopes of improving treaty negotiations between the English settlers and the Indians. He was generally concerned with stabilizing relations between the two parties. Once he learned their language, it didn't take long for him to understand their religion and customs. Eventually, he grew to appreciate Indian culture as much as his native German and adopted English heritages. The Indians learned to trust and love him as one of their own. They appreciated the talents of Weiser even more so than the English.

While living in New York, Weiser met Shiekilammy, Chief of the Oneidas, from the powerful Six Nations (the Iroquois Confederacy). They met in the woods of New York where Weiser was hunting. According to legend, Shiekilammy was so pleased to meet a white man who spoke his language that they became friends almost immediately. Weiser and Shiekilammy formed an effective partnership--the white man and the Indian--determined to establish good relations between the foreign settlers and the native Indians.

Soon after his marriage--Weiser had married young and proceeded to have 17 children, only 7 of whom lived to adulthood--Conrad Weiser packed up and moved from the Mohawk valley of New York to the Tulpehocken Valley in Pennsylvania. With Chief Shiekilammy and James Logan, Provincial Secretary for Pennsylvania, he then authored the Commonwealth's Indian Policy. Using his intimate knowledge of the Indian way of life, Weiser created a policy that strengthened the Six Nations by giving them sovereignty over all other Indians in Pennsylvania. This policy also strengthened the position of the English, since allowed the Six Nations to deal with other Indian tribes that were opposed to their plans. Because Weiser was respected by both parties to these negotiations, few objected to the policy he had crafted. He is commemorated in the Alle-Kiski area of Armstrong County for his early diplomacy on behalf of the colonial government in 1748.

Even if Weiser had not developed Indian policies or authored treaties, he would still be remembered as a model citizen who was a significant player in the expansion of Pennsylvania. In 1749, he helped found the city of Reading, and he played a role in the creation of Berks County in 1752. In Conrad Weiser's Account book, he revealed that he paid for the writing and copies of the petition, filing fees, and surveys for the proposed county.

Early Western Journals is the first official record of the English settlers' trips into the Indian country west of the Alleghenies. In it, Weiser writes that his main purpose on the trip was to carry and deliver a present to the Indians from the Pennsylvania and Virginia authorities. Some of these journals are now available online at the Library of Congress. In his later life, Conrad Weiser applied the skills and experience he had gained from his early years as a translator and interpreter to a series of more practical, and profitable, enterprises. He was a very successful farmer, tanner, and shop owner. But at the age of 64, Weiser's health rapidly deteriorated and he passed away. Upon his death, an Iroquois Indian observed, "We are at a great loss and sit in darkness...as since his death we cannot so well understand one another."

His name is currently preserved by the school district centered on Robesonia in Berks County. He immigrated in 1709 to New York; In the spring of 1709 thousands of Palatines left their families and homelands, boarded small boats on the Rhine River, and traveled to Rotterdam, Holland. From there the journey for one of those refugees ended this way: "Early in the morning of June 13, 1710, the ship Lyon drew into New York harbor. . . . On board the Lyon were 402 ‘poor Palatines,' among them thirteen-year-old Conrad Weiser."10 Weiser wrote in his autobiography:

In . . . 1709 my Father moved away from Great Aspach on the 24th of June, and took eight children with him. My eldest sister, Catrina, remained there with her husband, Conrad Boss, with whom she had two children. My father sold them his house, fields, meadows, vineyard and garden, but they could only pay him 75 gulden. . . so it was made a present to them. In about two months we reached London in England, along with several thousand Germans whom Queen Ann, of glorious remembrance, had taken in charge, and was furnishing with food. About Christmas day we embarked, and ten shiploads with about 4,000 souls were sent to America. On 17 June 1710 John Conrad Weiser; The Spykers, Crists, Kadermans, &c., came over with Conrad Weiser to New York, in 1710, from a place called Herrenburg, in Wurtemberg, Germany. In 1729, they all removed together to Tulpehocken, Berks County, Pennsylvania.
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Maria Margaret Batdorf

F, b. 10 October 1729, d. 22 December 1772
     Maria Margaret Batdorf was born on 10 October 1729 at Tulpenhocken, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Johannes Martin Batdorf and Margaretha Elisabetha Walborn. Maria Margaret Batdorf married John Conrad Weiser, son of Christopher Frederick Weiser and Catherine Elizabeth Roeder, on 29 January 1749 at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Maria Margaret Batdorf died on 22 December 1772 at Pennsylvania at age 43.
      Maria Margaret Batdorf was also known as Battorf. Maria Margaret Batdorf was also known as Maria Margaretha. As of 29 January 1749,her married name was Weiser. As of 29 January 1748/49,her married name was Weiser.
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Children of Maria Margaret Batdorf and John Conrad Weiser

Catherine Elizabeth Roeder

F, b. 25 December 1702, d. 29 July 1760
     Catherine Elizabeth Roeder was born on 25 December 1702 at Neuwied, Germany. She married Christopher Frederick Weiser, son of John Conrad Weiser and Anna Magdalena Uebele, in 1721. Catherine Elizabeth Roeder died on 29 July 1760 at Heidelberg, Berks, Pennsylvania, at age 57.
      Catherine Elizabeth Roeder was also known as Elizabeth. As of 1721,her married name was Weiser.
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Children of Catherine Elizabeth Roeder and Christopher Frederick Weiser

Anna Eva Feck

F
     Anna Eva Feck died; "Anno 1781, on the 11th of June, early about 2 o'clock, did the wife and mother Anna Eva Weiser, widow, fall asleep at the home of her son Peter in Womelsdorf Town, and on the 12th of June buried by the old Church" --document quoted by HMM Richards in The Weiser Family (LancasterPA.: The Pennsylvania German Society, 1924), p.27. She married Colonel John Conrad Weiser, son of John Conrad Weiser and Anna Magdalena Uebele, on 22 November 1720 at New York.
      Anna Eva Feck was also known as Anna Eve. As of 22 November 1720,her married name was Weiser.
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Anna Maria Weiser

F
     Anna Maria Weiser was the daughter of Colonel John Conrad Weiser and Anna Eva Feck. Anna Maria Weiser married Reverand Henry Melchior Muhlenberg in 1745.
      Anna Maria Weiser was also known as Maria. As of 1745,her married name was Muhlenberg.
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Child of Anna Maria Weiser and Reverand Henry Melchior Muhlenberg

Reverand Henry Melchior Muhlenberg

M, b. 6 September 1711, d. 7 October 1787
     Reverand Henry Melchior Muhlenberg was born on 6 September 1711 at Hanover, Germany. He married Anna Maria Weiser, daughter of Colonel John Conrad Weiser and Anna Eva Feck, in 1745. Reverand Henry Melchior Muhlenberg died on 7 October 1787 at age 76.
      Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, D. D., considered the Patriarch of the Lutheran Church in America, was the founder of the Muhlenberg family in this country to which he had come from Germany in 1742. He first went to Georgia, but soon afterwards came to Pennsylvania where he settled at The Trappe, now in Montgomery County, living there until his death in 1787 and establishing a high reputation for learning. He was the father of three sons, all of whom became eminent leaders in the affairs of their country: Major General Peter Muhlenberg, one of President Washington's generals throughout the entire Revolutionary War, a member of Congress while Washington was President, and later United States Senator from Pennsylvania; Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg, a member of the Continental Congress, Speaker of the House during the First and Third congresses of the United States, and twice candidate of the Federal party for governor of Pennsylvania; Henry Ernest Muhlenberg, D. D., eminent naturalist and Lutheran clergyman. The descendants of these three eminent men, as well as those of their four sisters, all achieved much distinction in the many different fields of human endeavor to which they devoted themselves. He immigrated in 1742.
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Child of Reverand Henry Melchior Muhlenberg and Anna Maria Weiser

Maria Salome Muhlenberg

F, b. 1766, d. 1827
     Maria Salome Muhlenberg was born in 1766. She was the daughter of Reverand Henry Melchior Muhlenberg and Anna Maria Weiser. Maria Salome Muhlenberg died in 1827.
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(?) Spyker

M, b. circa 1784
     (?) Spyker was born circa 1784 at Berks, Pennslyvania. He was the son of John Spyker and Anna Elizabeth Seidel.
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(?) Spyker

M, b. circa 1787
     (?) Spyker was born circa 1787 at Berks, Pennsylvania. He was the son of John Spyker and Anna Elizabeth Seidel.
Worldcon=N

(?) Spyker

F, b. circa 1790
     (?) Spyker was born circa 1790 at Berks, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of John Spyker and Anna Elizabeth Seidel.
Worldcon=N

Sarah Spyker

F, b. 15 September 1800
     Sarah Spyker was born on 15 September 1800 at Berks, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of John Spyker and Anna Elizabeth Seidel.
Worldcon=N

Martin Wenger

M, b. 23 December 1780, d. 23 November 1860
     Martin Wenger was born on 23 December 1780. He married Maria Elizabeth Light on 15 November 1801. Martin Wenger died on 23 November 1860 at Pennsylvania at age 79.
Worldcon=N

Child of Martin Wenger and Maria Elizabeth Light

Maria Elizabeth Light

F
     Maria Elizabeth Light married Martin Wenger on 15 November 1801.
      As of 15 November 1801,her married name was Wenger.
Worldcon=N

Child of Maria Elizabeth Light and Martin Wenger

Miron B. Spyker

M, b. February 1858, d. 7 September 1910
     Miron B. Spyker was born in February 1858 at Pennsylvania. He was the son of Peter Spyker and Margaret T. Hopkins. As of 1900, Miron B. Spyker was never married. He died on 7 September 1910 at State Hospital, Conewago, Warren, Pennsylvania, at age 52.
      Miron B. Spyker was also known as Myron. He was listed in Peter Spyker's household on the 1860 Census at Pine Creek, Jefferson, Pennsylvania.1 Miron B. Spyker was listed as a son in Margaret T. Hopkins's household on the 1880 Census at Brookville, Jefferson, Pennsylvania.2 Miron B. Spyker was listed as an inmate on the 1900 Census at State Hospital for the Insane, Conewango, Warren, Pennsylvania.3 He was listed as an inmate on the 1910 Census at State Hospital for the Insane, Conewango, Warren, Pennsylvania.
Worldcon=N

Citations

  1. [S248] U.S. Federal Census 1860 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Stamp 261. Dwelling 59.
  2. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Page 17. ED186. Dwelling 150.
  3. [S245] U.S. Federal Census 1900 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1900; Census Place: Conewango, Warren, Pennsylvania; Roll: 1492; Page: 8B; Enumeration District: 0132; FHL microfilm: 1241492.

Kennedy Perry Allshouse

M, b. 14 March 1861
     Kennedy Perry Allshouse was born on 14 March 1861 at Pennsylvania. He was the son of Henry Allshouse and Catharine Spyker.
     Kennedy Perry Allshouse was listed as a son in Henry Allshouse's household on the 1880 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania; living next door to Abner Spyker.1
Worldcon=N

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Page 58. ED198. Dwelling 231.

Clarence E. Allshouse

M, b. circa 1865
     Clarence E. Allshouse was born circa 1865 at Pennsylvania. He was the son of Henry Allshouse and Catharine Spyker.
     Clarence E. Allshouse was listed as a son in Henry Allshouse's household on the 1880 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania; living next door to Abner Spyker.1
Worldcon=N

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Page 58. ED198. Dwelling 231.

Amy F. Allshouse

F, b. May 1872
     Amy F. Allshouse was born in May 1872 at Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Henry Allshouse and Catharine Spyker.
     Amy F. Allshouse was listed as a daughter in Henry Allshouse's household on the 1880 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania; living next door to Abner Spyker.1
Worldcon=N

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Page 58. ED198. Dwelling 231.

John B. Speaker

M, b. November 1853, d. 1919
     John B. Speaker was born in November 1853 at Pennsylvania. He was the son of Abner Spyker and Catherine A. Gearhart. John B. Speaker married Nancy Ann Dobson circa 1877. John B. Speaker died in 1919.
      John B. Speaker was also known as Spyker. He was listed in Abner Spyker's household on the 1870 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania; living next door to Joel Spyker.1 John B. Speaker was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania; living next door to Abner Spyker.2 He was listed as the head of a family on the 1900 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania.3
Worldcon=N

Children of John B. Speaker and Nancy Ann Dobson

Citations

  1. [S247] U.S. Federal Census 1870 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Page 17. Stamp 169. Dwelling 106.
  2. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Page 58. ED198. Dwelling 229.
  3. [S245] U.S. Federal Census 1900 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, ED78. Dwelling 230.

Nancy Ann Dobson

F, b. March 1854, d. 1943
     Nancy Ann Dobson was born in March 1854 at Pennsylvania. She married John B. Speaker, son of Abner Spyker and Catherine A. Gearhart, circa 1877. Nancy Ann Dobson died in 1943.
      As of circa 1877,her married name was Spyker. As of circa 1877,her married name was Speaker. She was listed as wife in John B. Speaker's household on the 1880 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania; living next door to Abner Spyker.1 Nancy Ann Dobson had 5 with 5 living in 1900 children. She was listed as wife in John B. Speaker's household on the 1900 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania.2 Nancy Ann Dobson was listed as the head of a family on the 1920 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania; living next door to son-in-law Jenks McKinley.3
Worldcon=N

Children of Nancy Ann Dobson and John B. Speaker

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Page 58. ED198. Dwelling 229.
  2. [S245] U.S. Federal Census 1900 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, ED78. Dwelling 230.
  3. [S243] U.S. Federal Census 1920 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1920; Census Place: Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania; Roll: T625_1575; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 168; Image: 968.

Wayne Arthur Speaker

M, b. 23 May 1877
     Wayne Arthur Speaker was born on 23 May 1877 at Jefferson, Pennsylvania. He was the son of John B. Speaker and Nancy Ann Dobson. Wayne Arthur Speaker married Sarah Myrtle (?) before 1913.
      Wayne Arthur Speaker was also known as Spyker. Wayne Arthur Speaker was also known as Arthur J. He was listed as a son in John B. Speaker's household on the 1880 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania; living next door to Abner Spyker.1 Wayne Arthur Speaker was listed as a son in John B. Speaker's household on the 1900 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania.2
Worldcon=N

Child of Wayne Arthur Speaker and Sarah Myrtle (?)

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Page 58. ED198. Dwelling 229.
  2. [S245] U.S. Federal Census 1900 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, ED78. Dwelling 230.

Samuel Spyker

M, b. 29 June 1850, d. 30 November 1852
     Samuel Spyker was born on 29 June 1850. He was the son of Abner Spyker and Catherine A. Gearhart. Samuel Spyker died on 30 November 1852 at 2y 5m 1d at age 2. He was buried after 30 November 1852 at Saint Johns Cemetery Windy Hill, Stanton, Jefferson, Pennsylvania.
Worldcon=N

Catherine Eliza Spyker

F, b. 25 September 1851, d. 6 February 1933
     Catherine Eliza Spyker was born on 25 September 1851 at Coulent, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Abner Spyker and Catherine A. Gearhart. Catherine Eliza Spyker married unknown (?) circa 1870. Catherine Eliza Spyker married Robert D. Richards before 1874 at second marriage for both. Catherine Eliza Spyker died on 6 February 1933 at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania, at age 81. She was buried after 6 February 1933 at St. John's Cemetery, Brookville, Jefferson, Pennsylvania.
      Catherine Eliza Spyker was also known as E. C. Catherine Eliza Spyker was also known as Katherine E. Catherine Eliza Spyker was also known as Speaker. Catherine Eliza Spyker was also known as Eliza. As of before 1874,her married name was Richards. She was listed as a daughter in Robert D. Richards's household on the 1880 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania; living next door to Joel Speaker (Spyker).1 Catherine Eliza Spyker had 3 with 3 living in 1900 children. She was listed as wife in Robert D. Richards's household on the 1900 Census at Clover, Jefferson, Pennsylvania.2 Catherine Eliza Spyker had 3 with 3 living in 1910 children. She was listed as wife in Robert D. Richards's household on the 1910 Census at Rose, Jefferson, Pennsylvania.3
Worldcon=N

Children of Catherine Eliza Spyker and Robert D. Richards

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1136 Page Number 218A.
  2. [S245] U.S. Federal Census 1900 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, ED61. Dwelling 172.
  3. [S244] U.S. Federal Census 1910 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, ED89. Dwelling 154.